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Magazine Web Edition > October 1993 > Letters to the Editor

Letters to the Editor



I must congratulate you profusely for the superb job you and all associated are performing! It's gladdening to learn that we have organizations reviving the feeling of Hinduness in the blood of the Hindu so that they would neither be ashamed nor afraid of being Hindu.

Foolmaun Rajendra Kumar Cr[?]ve Coeur, Mauritius

Some Sort of Balance

I read Dr. Tandavan's article on "Doctors and Abortion" [Aug. '93]. It seemed that, to him, abortion is a selfish and self-indulgent decision. He is correct, but isn't having a child also the same? The phrase "a child to call one's own" comes to mind. Entire tribes and cultures can be wiped out due to deforestation of the world's rain forests, animals can be used for testing make-up, dogs and cats can be forcibly neutered. Some of us show or feel concern for these subjects, but when it comes to an unborn child, there is a huge debate on the ethics of aborting that child. The attention which the previous topics receive compared to the national coverage which abortion receives angers me. Abortion should not be forbidden, nor should it be made too legal. There must be some sort of a balance.

Jayanath P. Bhatt Fort Lee, New Jersey, USA

Meanings of Rituals?

Hindus, even in India, are doing many rituals in their day-to-day life but without knowing the meaning behind it. For example, if an aged Hindu dies, on that day, the third day, the fifth day, the 12th, 13th, 16th days, the Hindus are doing so many rituals. What motives are behind these and why on these days--i don't know any more than 95% of the rest of all Hindus. So I request you to allot at least a page every month for a ritual and for its motive.

C. Arockiaswamy Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu, India

Very Badly Needed

I am pleased that you are publishing "Hinduism Today" and thereby serving a great cause by propagating Hindu religion in USA. Indians settled here need this very badly, otherwise, being far away from their native land, they are bound to loose their learning and get immersed in the Western culture.

Mr. R. R. Verma Briarwood, New York, USA

Seize This Opportunity

I'm not a born Hindu, but I am a subscriber of Hinduism Today for nearly a year. Since then my life has changed. I think that it is pure sadness when a Hindu refuses to see such valuable literature as Hinduism Today. The message that I wish to give to all Hindus is, "Seize this golden opportunity to take a subscription of Hinduism Today!"

Mrs. Tara Osman Beau-Bassin, Mauritius

Children's Column?

I am writing to thank you for giving me such a wonderful sense of belonging as I read Hinduism Today. The wealth of information is worth preserving for my little ones to enrich themselves with as they grow older. I had come across a letter from a reader in an earlier issue asking for a children's column. Responding to this appeal, I shall soon be sending ideas to you for approval.

Mona Vijaykar Fremont, California, USA

War on Ignorance

The Hindu family has long since swerved from the true path, their dharma, due to ignorance, superstition and many unreasonable dogmas. Hinduism Today has been fighting against these ills so as to bring back the spiritual value lost. The articles are not only inspiring but bring us the richness of our traditional heritage--the greatness of Hinduism. I wish you success in your holy war against conversion and ignorance of our culture and dharma.

Mr. Vedeswar Gopee Pamplemousses, Mauritius

Guts and Creativity

"In Search of a Home," [June, 1993]-- We Sindhis reading this provoking article started reminiscing how we suffered for no fault of ours. We are treated as second-class citizens, having no state of our own. Lavina Melwani has correctly said that we are world-wandering refugees (not Banjaras) who were kicked out of Sindh, with few resources beyond guts and creativity.

Mr. Motilall Butani Cerritos, California, USA

To All 700,000 Villages

I appreciate the plan to convey this best newspaper for the Hindu family to all 700,000 villages. In your July editorial, you have mentioned distribution in all the 14 states but there are 24 states in India: 1) Andra Pradesh, 2) Arunachal Pradesh, 3) Assam, 4) Bihar, 5) Gujarat, 6) Hariyana, 7) Himachal Pradesh, 8) Jammu and Kashmir, 9) Karnataka, 10) Kerala, 11) Madhya Pradesh, 12) Maharashtra, 13) Manipur, 14) Meghalaya, 15) Mizaram, 16) Nagaland, 17) Orissa, 18) Punjab, 19) Rajasthan, 20) Sikkim, 21) Tamil Nadu, 22) Tripura, 23) Uttar Pradesh and 24) West Bengal.

Dr. S. Sharma Nottingham, United Kingdom

Stop Cheating Ourselves

I have been thinking and telling people for a long time that "All religions are not the same and they cannot be." ["Truth is One, Paths are Many," April, 1993] Only Hindu elites claim equality of religions. The basics of Hinduism are not only different but sometimes contradict the Western religions of Christianity and Islam. The attitude (proclaiming equality) is due to the sense of inferiority and non-identity Hindus have developed over the thousand years due to slavery under Islam and Christians. This is the first time I read where a Swamiji has confirmed my views. It is high time that we stop cheating ourselves with this avidya [ignorance.]

Govind Thakkar Long Beach, California, USA

Appreciations

Hinduism Today is impressively laid out, and the popular style of writing makes it a good communicator of thought. My life has been spent in language and literature education, and I appreciated the care both in the reporting/editorial end and the print layout of the publication which make it one of the more attractive in its field.

Dr. Gopal Kirshnan Richmond, B. C., Canada

Christian Havoc

I am a reader of Hinduism Today for the past three years. I am convinced that it really cares for the big Hindu family the world over and is packed with much relevant information which is very inspiring. It's high time we organize ourselves to face the challenges of the day especially from mass media from countries including our own. I would like to read more about "Salut et Guerison" (Assembly of God) and other such Christian sects which are working havoc in my community.

Dr. H. Bissoonauth Rose-Hill, Mauritius

Forget Feelings of Revenge

Thanks to your journal, I have learned a lot about the Ayodhya dilemma which has been kept in silence by other editors. I appreciate the views of Miss Smriti Aggarwal, the youth editor for the India West and India Currents magazines of California when she says [My Turn, Feb. 1993] that God, no matter what religion, doesn't uphold violence and finally asks, "Why can't we understand that to move forward we have to forget the past?" And also Paramhans Swami Maheshwarananda of Austria who says: "Still one should be able to forget and overcome feelings of revenge. We are all brothers and sisters."

Mahendralall Gangabeesoon Phoenix, Mauritius

A Girl's School Tool

This publication has really interested me because I do Hinduism as a subject at school and I think that it will help me in my studies. Reading this publication lets people meet friends, know more about life.

Miss Padmini Chocalingum Piton, Mauritius

American "Yukh?"

On the Editorial, "India what would she be without dharma?" [July, 1993] Why? Why use the name of Annie Besant as a reference, when there are many, many very great Maharishis who have inspired the local population of the country and who have kept the torch of spirituality burning for centuries. You could have used names of Raja Rammohan Roy, Vinoba-bhave, or for that matter, Ramana Maharishi. Page 12, headline, "Meat? Yukh." This is very American. Save this young generation from the process of conditioning.

Mr. Rahul Barot United Kingdom

Photo Attribution

The photo of the painting of Swami Vivekananda by Stuart Brandt on page one of the August, 1993, issue was provided courtesy of Vedanta Society of Kansas City.


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