Hindu Press International


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Arthashastra On-Line

Posted on 2003/3/23 8:47:02 ( 1098 reads )


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USA, March 23, 2003: Those interested in purusing Kautilya's Arthashastra may find the complete text at "source" above. Arthashastra is a remarkable treatise on sophisticated government written 2,300 years ago.




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U.S. Assistant Secretary of State Says India Did Act on Gujarat Violence

Posted on 2003/3/22 8:49:02 ( 631 reads )


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WASHINGTON D.C., March 22, 2003: The Indian government has taken "much action" against those behind the Gujarat violence but it was not reflected due to the "agonizingly slow" legal system in the country, US Assistant Secretary of State for South Asia Christina Rocca has said. "There have been a number of arrests and prosecutions," she said on Friday, responding to questions on the Gujarat violence during her testimony before a Subcommittee on Asia and Pacific. "The legal system in India is agonizingly slow and that gives the impression that nothing is happening. But the fact of the matter is that they did take action and they are continuing to take action," she said. "This was a stain on their secular record. And no one is more concerned about it, I believe, than the Indians themselves."




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Mystery Powder Prompts Scare in U.S. Post Office

Posted on 2003/3/22 8:48:02 ( 725 reads )


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FOXBORO, MASSACHUSETTS, March 20, 2003: A red powdery substance discovered Monday in a letter by mailroom workers at Invensys prompted a partial evacuation of the facility. With the heightened alert due to the war with Iraq, local firefighters were concerned when responding to a call about an unknown powdery substance at the Invensys mailroom. Deputy Chief Steve Bagley declared a Tier 1 alert, a low-level hazardous materials emergency. Also responding to the scene were five members of a regional hazardous materials team, who donned "hazmat" (hazardess materials) suits and entered the building to secure the letter mailed from an unfamiliar address in India. Local firefighters had planned to transport the letter for analysis to the state Department of Public Health in Boston the following day when they learned the substance in question was kumkum powder, used by millions of Hindu women and in temple ceremonies.




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Air India Gives in to Customer Demand and Drops "Inauspicious Thursday" Flight

Posted on 2003/3/22 8:47:02 ( 683 reads )


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GUWAHTI, INDIA, March 19, 2003: So many people of north east India have refused to fly on Thursdays, Air India has been forced to change its schedule to Sundays. "It is now official. The flight will be on Sunday," said an Air India official here yesterday, much to the relief of the travel agents for whom it had been a big headache. "There is a long tradition of not doing anything good on Thursday afternoons. So why should one fly abroad?" asked Powal Barua of Travel Aid. Air India, which initially wanted to drop the flight, has now rescheduled it, giving in to the region's overwhelming demand. HPI is interested to learn the reason this area of India considers Thursday inauspicious.




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Devotees Walk the Dakor Pilgrimage

Posted on 2003/3/21 8:49:02 ( 726 reads )


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MEHAMDABAD, INDIA, March 14, 2003: All roads seem to lead to Dakor, Kheda district, as pilgrims of various age groups, from one to 75, walk the stretch of road for a "darshan of Ranchhod Rai" (Lord Krishna.) Close to a million people were expected to visit the pilgrimage shrine before the 17th, the Poonam of Holi. Since the early hours of Friday, groups of people passed along the road that joins Jashodanagar Char Rasta and Mehamdabad city. "I have made it a point to walk from Viramgam to Dakor every year for the past 30 years, except for one or two years when I had to miss it as I was not keeping well. Although it is getting difficult nowadays, I will continue to walk every year," said 75-year old Sakhiben Rathod of Viramgam. A large number of organizations have set up stalls every 50 meters along the road between Ahmedabad and Dakor. Water, juice, snacks and even food is being provided free. While devotees have been visiting the temple on the Poonam of Holi for many decades, recently the number of pilgrims has increased drastically.




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Devotees Walk the Dakor Pilgrimage

Posted on 2003/3/21 8:49:02 ( 765 reads )

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MEHAMDABAD, INDIA, March 14, 2003: All roads seem to lead to Dakor, Kheda district, as pilgrims of various age groups, from one to 75, walk the stretch of road for a "darshan of Ranchhod Rai" (Lord Krishna.) Close to a million people were expected to visit the pilgrimage shrine before the 17th, the Poonam of Holi. Since the early hours of Friday, groups of people passed along the road that joins Jashodanagar Char Rasta and Mehamdabad city. "I have made it a point to walk from Viramgam to Dakor every year for the past 30 years, except for one or two years when I had to miss it as I was not keeping well. Although it is getting difficult nowadays, I will continue to walk every year," said 75-year old Sakhiben Rathod of Viramgam. A large number of organizations have set up stalls every 50 meters along the road between Ahmedabad and Dakor. Water, juice, snacks and even food is being provided free. While devotees have been visiting the temple on the Poonam of Holi for many decades, recently the number of pilgrims has increased drastically.


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Indian Cooking Can Be Bad for Your Heart

Posted on 2003/3/21 8:48:02 ( 794 reads )

Source: Canadian Press

ONTARIO, CANADA, March 15, 2003: Indo-Canadians are being warned that their traditional cooking, heavy on clarified butter and whole-milk yogurt, is bad for their hearts. The issue has become something of a crusade for Edmonton Hindu priest Acharya Shiv Shankar Diwivedi. He's been seeing too many people in their 40s and 50s suffering heart attacks, and has made heart-healthy living a major theme when talking with temple devotees. "The south Asian community is not doing much exercise and they're following the tradition of heavy and rich food," Diwivedi says. Many resist change because the food is what their forefathers ate, he says. However, in India life was less stressful and much more vigorous physically, he reminds them. The cause has been picked up by south Asian physicians and other health professionals, who have organized a day-long conference today on heart disease specifically for Indo-Canadians. "Indo-Canadians have a higher than average risk of heart attack," says Dr. Sunil Desai, a pediatric oncologist. "And while the rich diet and lack of exercise are part of the problem, there may also be a genetic predisposition among Indo-Canadians to heart disease. What we call normal cholesterol for the white population may not apply to the Indian population," he says. Neelam Makhani, a dietitian with Caritas hospitals, says that while many Indo-Canadians are vegetarian, their cooking involves a lot of deep frying in clarified butter (and other oils). The other problem, she says, is that south Asians use homogenized milk to make yogurt, one of their staple foods.


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The Ramayana Comes to The Bay Area

Posted on 2003/3/21 8:47:02 ( 738 reads )

Source: San Francisco Weekly

SAN FRANCISCO, U.S.A., March 13, 2003: The ambitious retelling of the epic Hindu myth, Ramayana, hits its stride with the A.C.T. Conservatory's production. This epic story of King Rama, exiled by his stepmother and forced to wander the Indian subcontinent with Princess Sita and a number of friends before he rises again to his rightful throne, is one of two story cycles that serve as epic sources of Hindu myth. Until they're needed onstage, New York director Ruben Polendo has actors sit quietly around the floor at little mirrored tables doing their own makeup. Jeffrey Evans plays his own score on a variety of bells and drums. Near the middle of the story, the action hits full stride with the stories of Hanuman, the monkey king, and his straw-dressed ape-men retaking the ancient island of Lanka from Ravana and his men. The show is worth the price of admission and offers a rare taste of traditional Hindu theater.


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Indian NGO Initiates "Safe Holi" Practices

Posted on 2003/3/20 8:49:02 ( 679 reads )


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PUNE, INDIA, March 15, 2003: The non-governmental organization (NGO), Kalpavriksha, has offered healthy alternatives to chemical colors to ensure safe celebrations of Holi. Kalpavriksha has obtained 100 percent natural and safe colors from Delhi-based NGO Development Alternatives. The have headed a campaign against highly toxic dyes and powders used for Holi colors and are teaching women to make eco-friendly colors. Many of the colors can be prepared at home with ingredients found in the house or garden such as beets, turmeric, marigold flowers and powdered hibiscus. Other NGOs who were successful in their campaign against water and noise pollution during Ganesha Visarjana and Deepavali festivals have appealed to people not to cut and burn trees for Holi and urged everyone to collect the garbage littering the streets following the festivities.




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So When Was Holi Supposed to Be?

Posted on 2003/3/20 8:48:02 ( 704 reads )


Source: HPI





KAUAI, U.S.A., March 20, 2003: As reported recently, the Union Ministry of Home Affairs in India declared Holi should be celebrated on March 19, while many Hindu priests held that Holi was actually a day earlier. HPI asked readers for their authoritative comments, and a number were received here from astrologers and priests giving their insights into the conundrum. All but one agreed Holi should be celebrated on March 18. Respected astrologer Chakrapani Ullal gave the following insight: "All festivities are observed according to the thithis (a "lunar day," see below). Therefore it is important to know when it begins and when it ends. Sometimes differences among some religious leaders arise because many Panchangas (Hindu religious calendars) do not use the same ayanamsha (calendar of astrological data). They calculate according to a formula without making adjustments. These differences result in the observation of thithis slightly differently. Some would think that since puranmashi (or prathama, the full moon) has ended after sunrise maybe Holi should be observed the following day (19th.) However, I think once puranmashi is over in the morning, Holi could begin thereafter on the 18th. I fully agree with Laxmi Narayan Shastriji (chief priest of the Birla Temple, India)." Most Hindu festivals are calculated according to the tithis. A tithi is a lunar day, approximately 1/30 of the time it takes the moon to orbit the Earth. Because of their means of calculation (based on the difference of the longitudinal angle between the position of the sun and the moon), tithis vary in length. A second person knowledgeable in astrology explained the issue this way. "The holiday is celebrated on prathama, the day after the full moon tithi. Usually we consider that the tithi at sunrise to rule the day, so in this case, purnima tithi rules the18th, even though prathama starts at 9:45 am. The problem is, prathama thithi ends in the early morning of the 19th, so most of that day will actually be dvitiya and the scriptures say Holi should be celebrated on prathama (the day after full moon). Consequently, in a case like this, most would designate the 18th as Holi."




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Delhi Officials Asked to Solve Beggar Problems at Temples

Posted on 2003/3/20 8:47:02 ( 992 reads )


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NEW DELHI, INDIA, March 18, 2003: The Delhi High Court on Monday directed the officials of the Social Welfare Department of the Delhi government to visit four temples in the capital and report on the problems created by beggars and to suggest ways begging can be eliminated. The temples where the problem was at its peak were identified -- Hanuman temple in Connaught Place, Sai Baba temple on Lodhi Road, Hanuman temple in Kashmir Gate and the Bairon temple near the Old Fort. Attorney Rajeev Awasthi told the court that there was an organized gang which brought the beggars to the temples on chosen days. "The beggars were earning US$100 to $125 every day at the temples," he said. V.K. Shali, counsel for Delhi government, said the Social Welfare Department was doing its best to keep the beggars away from the public places and has been providing vocational training to relieve them from depending on alms.




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Pandit Ravi Shankar Takes Issue With Today's Fusion Music

Posted on 2003/3/20 8:46:02 ( 699 reads )


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NEW DELHI, INDIA, March 17, 2003: Sitar virtuoso Pandit Ravi Shankar, often praised for pioneering collaborations with musicians from the West, does not identify with the fusion music of today. "I was never involved in fusion music as it is understood today," he said at a press conference to announce a concert with daughter Anoushka on March 22. Shankar, called the "father of world music" by the late Beatle George Harrison, maintained his musical collaborations with Harrison, British violinist Yehudi Menuhin, French flautist Jean Pierre Rampal, Japanese musicians and symphony orchestras the world over were "experiments." "I have experimented, but the compositions were always based on Indian classical music," Shankar said. He felt fusion music of today was more of a commercial attraction and a gimmick. "But I do agree there are many brilliant musicians doing a lot of good work in the area." The maestro plans to teach the nuances of classical music to talented students through the Ravi Shankar Institute for Music and Performing Arts that will be fully operational in the capital later this year.




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U.S. Scholar Seeks Input for Anthropological Study of Diaspora Hindus

Posted on 2003/3/20 8:45:02 ( 862 reads )


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CLEVELAND, U.S.A., March 17, 2003: For the purpose of studying the Hindu identity in the United States diaspora community, Vimal Bhatnagar, Ph.D. candidate at Case Western Reserve University, is seeking contacts with various Hindu temples, community organizations, magazines, and web pages around the U.S. that serve the Hindu diaspora community here. Kindly contact Ms. Bhatnagar at "source" above if you care to participate in the research.




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Registry Says Hindu Gods and Goddesses May Be Advertising Trademarks

Posted on 2003/3/16 8:49:02 ( 809 reads )


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NEW DELHI, INDIA, March 16, 2003: Does the display of Gods and Goddesses on commercial goods like tobacco products hurt the religious sentiments of people? No, says the office of Trademarks Registry. In an affidavit filed before the Delhi High Court, the Trademarks Registry has said that Hinduism has innumerable Gods and Goddesses and to put them all in the schedule of Emblems and Names (prevention of improper use) Act, would be "misconceived and unsustainable." This decision was a response to a petition filed in the High Court, which called for immediate withdrawal of trademarks that hurt the religious sentiments of the people. The petition, filed by Sanjeev Kumar Chaswal, submitted that the Registrar of Trademarks has granted registration using Lord Ganesha, Lord Krishna, Lord Siva and others for products like tobacco, zarda, jute products etc. "This is an insult to the sanctity of the revered Gods," the petition said. The Trademarks Registry's affidavit stated, "The Emblems and Names Act, of 1950 does not envisage inclusion of names of Gods and Goddesses in the schedule of the act. Only emblems of national importance and of secular institutions are sought to be protected."




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"Paradise Tree" Promises Immense Potential

Posted on 2003/3/16 8:48:02 ( 766 reads )


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TIRUPATI, INDIA, March 5, 2003: Simarouba (Simarouba Glauca), also known as the "Paradise tree," a native of El Salvador, Central America, was first introduced in Amravati, Maharashtra, in 1966. Syamasundar Joshi, a scientist in the University of Agricultural Sciences, Bangalore, who has studied the tree, believes apart from edible purposes, it could be a promising ingredient in the manufacture of soaps, lubricants, paints, polishes and pharmaceuticals. Not only the seed, but every part of the tree is useful in some way. The oil cake makes a valuable organic manure as it is rich in nitrogen, phosphorus and potash. The shells form the raw material for the hardboard industry. The fruit pulp can be used in the beverage and fermentation industry as it contains 11 percent sugar. The leaf and bark contains simarubin, a chemical used in curing diarrhea and malaria. The insect-resistant wood is okay for light furniture industry, toys, packing material, paper pulp and matches. The Forest Department's Biotechnology Research Center (Biotrim) at Tirupati has been growing the tree for the last six years on a demonstration plot, without actually knowing its potential. Given the perennial drought in the State and that the tree requires no maintenance, it is believed it offers great potential for farmers.




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