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South Africa likely to Commemorate Gandhi's Contributions
Posted on 2001/3/28 22:46:02 ( 749 reads )


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DURBAN, SOUTH AFRICA, March 27, 2001: The name of Mahatma Gandhi, whose campaign of passive resistance was born in South Africa, is expected to be one of 20 to be immortalized in marble here. Special marble tiles, each engraved with the still closely guarded names, and in some cases, the palm prints of those to be honored, will be unveiled in a park outside the City Hall here Saturday as a prelude to the annual African Renaissance Festival.




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Technology-Sector Slump Threatens Foreign Workers
Posted on 2001/3/28 22:45:02 ( 720 reads )


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USA, March 28, 2001: Thousands of foreign workers in America's slumping high technology sector are set to lose their jobs and their right to stay in the US. In the past few years, the US government has given hundreds of thousands of foreigners with high-tech skills H1-B temporary work permits. If they are laid off, they are not allowed to remain in the US or begin another job unless they have another visa application pending. The collapse of many Internet start-ups and recent layoffs in Silicon Valley mean that tens of thousands of workers, mainly from India, China and Western Europe, could be forced to return home.




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Paying Homage to a Hindu Holy Man
Posted on 2001/3/28 22:44:02 ( 748 reads )


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DALLAS, USA, March 24, 2001: According to Hindu tradition, the saint Shri Dnyaneshwar -- while still a child, in response to a challenge -- made a buffalo recite the Vedas, proving that all creatures are united by the soul. Later he wrote Dnyaneshwari, a religious work still popular today. Maharashtrians here are staging a play on his life, "Om Namoji Aadhya," written by Deepak Karanjikar of Dallas. Mr. Karanjikar said he decided to focus on the saint as he noticed similarities between the value systems prevalent in the late 13th and early 21st centuries. "During that time (1200 ce), the values of life had gone down. People were just fighting for their own lives, their own family," Mr. Karanjikar said. "History is completing a cycle here."




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Open House as Sikhs Read Scriptures at Home
Posted on 2001/3/28 22:43:02 ( 683 reads )


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DALLAS, USA, March 03, 2001: Participants in the Sikh ceremony called the Akhand Path, a continuous reading of the 1,430 pages of the Sikh sacred book, the Sri Guru Granth, can drop in at any time day or night. There's a religious requirement that the kitchen always be open. The ceremony, done for reasons such as a birthday or anniversary or the death of a loved one, was born in India two centuries ago as a reaction to persecution, and has become a mark of the faith's identity in 21st-century America. Recently, the Suri family consecrated a new home in Plano with the religious reading. Shortly after 8 a.m. on a recent Thursday, the Suris and friends prepared for the prayers. "Anything good in the religion starts in the morning," Mrs. Suri said.




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Educator Calls for Warning Stickers on "Harry Potter" Books
Posted on 2001/3/28 22:42:02 ( 749 reads )


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SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA, March 27, 2001: The Rev. Robert Frisken of Christian Community Schools Ltd. here does not want the stories about Harry Potter, the trainee wizard, banned, but suggests the books should carry warning stickers before they are placed in school libraries. "The ordinary person is typified as being bad because they have no magic powers, and heroes are the people who are using the occult. Good finds itself in the occult, which is an inversion of morality for many Christian people." Frisken will, this month, send letters to parents in each of the 90 independent member schools across Australia asking them to consider the issues raised in the stories and discuss them with their children. The books have become a controversial addition to classrooms in America -- figures show they were the most challenged books of 1999. Efforts to restrict their use, or remove them from classrooms and school libraries were reported in 19 states.




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Yoga's the Rave in London
Posted on 2001/3/27 22:49:02 ( 711 reads )


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LONDON, ENGLAND, March 24, 2001: Everybody is doing it, or everybody wants to do it. From ashtanga to hatha, yoga classes are popping up to accommodate modern successful people. In the past 18 months, the yoga craze has evolved and melted into the life of a Londoner. Quoting Cat de Rham who teaches Iyengar-based classes in Chelsea, "People take up yoga thinking of it as a work-out and find something else is being answered."




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ITC Bans Offensive Advertisement
Posted on 2001/3/27 22:48:02 ( 778 reads )


Source: The Guardian





UNITED KINGDOM, March 7, 2001: Ruling that the advertisement caused a personal offense to their culture and religion, the Independent Television Commission has banned a recent advertsements promoting Chicken Tonight. It showed a Hindu woman meditating and chanting in front of a chicken. She became upset with the chicken for not joining her. Hindus were offended by the odd commercial, and ITC guidelines clearly reject advertsements that denigrate religion.




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England's Multicultural Leicester
Posted on 2001/3/27 22:47:02 ( 765 reads )


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LEICESTER, U.K., March 18, 2001: The focal point of the Leicester's Asian community is Belgrave Road known as the Golden Mile because more gold jewellery is sold here than anywhere else in Europe. The road's display of 6,000 lights during Diwali, the Hindu Festival of Lights is said to be the biggest outside India. The city's major Asian event is the annual Mela, a huge cultural festival that attracts crowds of 100,000.




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The Fabulous Heritage Of Cambodia
Posted on 2001/3/27 22:46:02 ( 829 reads )


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CAMBODIA, JANUARY 13 2001: In the jungled retreat of Kobal Spien, former Khmer Rouge guerrillas act as tourist guides to point out intricate Hindu and Buddhist carvings such as the River of 1,000 Lingas; the riverbed is dotted with sculpted stone carvings, including Siva Lingas, stone frogs, Buddhas and the many-headed Naga snake, all of which are believed to strengthen and purify the water. Until two years ago the area was an impregnable Khmer stronghold. Now, slowly, after three decades of bitter warfare, the treasures and history of the area are finally being revealed. The now-defeated Khmer Rouge did not destroy the temples. They were often used as military bases or field hospitals. But peace could be disastrous for what remains, because of the smuggling of artifacts and the depredations of tourism.




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Hindus Attack Mosque, Burn Muslim holy books
Posted on 2001/3/27 22:45:02 ( 836 reads )


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AMRITSAR, INDIA, March 23, 2001: Police commandos were posted in a northern Indian city to prevent religious clashes March 22 after Hindu nationalists desecrated a mosque and burned copies of the Koran. Members of the All-India Hindu Protection Committee entered the 200-year-old Kheruddin Mosque in Amritsar late Wednesday, burned copies of the Islamic holy book, and threw pork, a meat forbidden to Muslims, into the main compound, mosque manager Mohammad Anwar said. The Hindu group said the attack was in retaliation for the slaughter of cows in Afghanistan by the Taliban regime, which said it needed to atone for the delay in destroying ancient statues of Buddha that were deemed idolatrous.




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Cloning, Not So Safe?
Posted on 2001/3/27 22:44:02 ( 751 reads )


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HAWAII, OAHU, March 25, 2001: Scientists are having second thoughts about cloning. Since 1997 when the first mammal, Dolly the sheep, was produced by scientists in Scotland, cloning techniques have been perfected by researchers. However even with the utmost diligence only 2 or 3 percent of attempts to clone are successful. Those that do survive often suffer from developmental delays, heart defects, lung problems or severe weight gain. Dolly herself had to be separated from other sheep in order to control her diet as she kept gaining weight. Under normal circumstances an animal egg and sperm take several years to mature. With cloning the egg is expected to replicate an adult's genetic material in minutes or hours, apparently leading to errors in the DNA code.




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Mumbai Hindus Have a New Year's Parade
Posted on 2001/3/27 22:43:02 ( 753 reads )


Source: Hinduism Today, Ramesh Zawar





MUMBAI, INDIA, March 26, 2001: For the first time a long march was organized to mark the beginning of Hindu New Year in Dombiwali, a fast growing northeast suburb of Mumbai area. About 40,000 men and women joined in. Normally, the first day of new year is marked with raising the flag at the top of home and prayers within home. Hindus have objected to January 1 New Year's parades in Mumbai, because January 1 is not the new year on any Hindu calendar.




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Curry Firm Creates 1000 Jobs
Posted on 2001/3/27 22:42:02 ( 817 reads )


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STAFFORDSHIRE, U.K, March 27, 2001: Perween Warsi's S&A Foods curry firm, which began in its owner's kitchen, now employs 1,000 people. S&A Foods will open a new factory in Staffordshire with the aid of a government grant. The company sells US$112 million chilled and frozen ready-meals through the supermarket chains Safeway, Morrisons and Waitrose. Curry is fast becoming one of the favorite foods of the English.




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Children Of Other Faiths In Catholic Schools
Posted on 2001/3/26 22:49:02 ( 740 reads )


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BOSTON, MASSACHUCETTS, March 25, 2001: Twenty-six first-graders from St. Catherine of Genoa School in Somerville file into the basement chapel of the Roman Catholic church. But Hriday Chawla isn't thinking about Jesus Christ. He's speaking to Ganesh, the Hindu God. Classmate Rupinder Kaur, a girl with long dark hair, worships the Sikh Waheguru. Roughly 25 percent of the 195 children in the pre-kindergarten-through-grade 8 school are non-Catholics, said Principal Theresa Demsey. Nationally, 13.6 percent of Catholic school students are non-Catholic, a number that's risen steadily from 2.7 percent 30 years ago. All students are required to take courses in Catholic religion and to attend services. The religion classes are sure to confuse and confound the religious beliefs they are taught at home. Yet parents ignore this devasting impact upon the child's mind in the hope of getting a "better education." Even the Church is questioning why it teaches non-Catholics, especially for those Catholic schools where there are no Catholic children at all.




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Sri Lanka to Build Replica of Afganistan Buddhas
Posted on 2001/3/26 22:48:02 ( 675 reads )


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COLOMBO, SRI LANKA, March 26, 2001: Sri Lankan Buddhists say they will build replicas of two ancient Buddha statues destroyed earlier this month by Afghanistan's Taleban rulers. The private Maha Bodhi Society said it was hoping to receive public donations to create the replicas of the giant statues carved from a cliff face in central Bamiyan. The organisation said it would initially build a scaled down version of the larger statue, which was 51 metres (170 feet) tall, so that succeeding generations would know what it looked like. Sri Lanka, where Buddhism is the major religion, had earlier offered to finance an international operation to save the statues, which were more than 1,500 years old. After they were destroyed, the Sri Lankan government offered to buy the rubble and any remains.




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